Good Beer Guide 2016

Update!

Our branch entries for potential entry into the Good Beer Guide (GBG) 2016 have now been chosen!

Thanks to those members that put forward nominations & to those that attended the meeting to take part in the voting. A special thanks goes to those who volunteered to carry out the surveys!

The entrants will be announced on the official publication date in September!

Dog and Bone progress to the final 16

Lincolnshire CAMRA’s Pub of the Year, our very own Dog and Bone, John Street, Lincoln, has done it again! Blowing the competition out of the water, taking the crown of East Midlands Pub of the Year for 2014!

The other pubs in contention were:
• Derbyshire: Furnace Inn, Derby
• Leicestershire (inc. Rutland & Northamptonshire): Free Trade Inn, Sileby.
• Nottinghamshire: Horse & Jockey, Stapleford

Landlords Chris and Sarah Sorrell are over the moon after progressing to the last 16 in the competition.
Sarah says of their customers “We could not be happier and want to thank you all so much for supporting the Dog and Bone, the community and friendly atmosphere you create make it a special place. Just so overwhelmed!”

They will go up against:

  • Central Southern Region: 5 Bells, Wickham, Berkshire.
  • East Anglia Region: The Victoria Inn, Colchester.
  • Kent Region: The Windmill, Sevenoaks Weald, Sevenoaks.
  • Merseyside & Cheshire Region: The Freshfield, Freshfield, Formby.
  • Scotland / Northern Ireland: The Steam Packet Inn, Isle of Whithorn, Scotland.
  • West Pennines; Prince of Wales Foxfield, Cumbria.
  • North East Region: The John Bull, Alnwick, Northumberland.
  • Greater London Region: The Door Hinge, Welling.
  • Greater Manchester Region: The Harewood Arms, Broadbottom.
  • Yorkshire Region: The Kelham Island Tavern Sheffield, South Yorkshire.
  • Surrey & Sussex Region: Surrey Oak, Parkgate, Newdigate.
  • Wales Region: The Pilot, Mumbles, Swansea.
  • West Midlands Region: The Beacon Hotel, Sedgley, Dudley.
  • Wessex Region: The Lamplighter, St Helier.
  • South West Ham: The Salutation Inn, Berkley, Gloucestershire

Editor of The Good Beer Guide 2015, Roger Protz, said of the final 16,
“Being named as one the top 16 pubs in the UK is a huge honour that each of these pubs should be hugely proud of. These pubs have won their branch’s Pub of the Year, then gone on to win the regional competition, and now have a chance of being crowned National Pub of the Year – making every one of them a winner in their own right.”

The National Pub of the Year for 2014 (chosen from the above finalists) will be announced in February 2015.

Dog and Bone takes county crown

Lincoln CAMRA’s top pub, the Dog and Bone on John Street, has gone one better, with the award of Lincolnshire Pub of the Year for 2014. Judges from the Campaign for Real Ale visited the winning pubs from each of the CAMRA branches in the county and assessed the quality of the beer, the atmosphere, service, community focus and value for money.

The other pubs is the competition were:

  • Half Moon, Willingham by Stow.
  • Malt Shovel, Scunthorpe.
  • Nobody Inn, Grantham.
  • Brown Cow, Louth.
  • Nottingham House, Cleethorpes.

Lincoln CAMRA secretary, Steve Renshaw, said, “I recently described the Dog and Bone as Lincoln’s best kept secret but, with these awards, landlords Chris and Sarah Sorrell are now getting the recognition they deserve.”

One of the changes Chris and Sarah made since taking over the pub in February 2013 was to convert an outside storage shed into a cosy drinking area. The Kennel, as it is called, can be used for private functions or by community groups. Activities based at the pub include a walking group, jam sessions, art exhibitions and cook-offs. And, recently, a craft and chat group has started. Members meet on a monthly basis to discuss ideas and share techniques. So far, they have covered sewing machines, brooch making and felt making; the next session will involve tie-dying.

The Dog and Bone now goes forward to the East Midlands round of the competition, where it will be up against the best pubs from Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Rutland.

30 years of good beer at the Vic

The 2014 edition of CAMRA’s “Good Beer Guide” sees the 30th consecutive
appearance of Lincoln’s Victoria. The local CAMRA branch has presented a
certificate to the pub to mark the achievement.

Nestling in the shadow of the castle walls, the Vic has two small rooms and
a heated outdoor seating area. Batemans XB, Yella Belly Gold and Castle
Rock Harvest Pale are regular beers, along with up to four guests plus a
real cider and a perry.

Tony Eastwood, founder of drinks wholesaler Small Beer Ltd, bought the
Victoria from Whitbread and, after extensive structural work, it reopened in
December 1983. As a free house, it was an instant hit with the growing
number of real-ale enthusiasts in Lincoln, and it was included in the “Good
Beer Guide” for the first time in the 1985 edition.

In 1998, when Small Beer decided to concentrate on the wholesaling side of
the business, they sold their three pubs to the Tynemill pub group.
Tynemill was founded in 1977 by former CAMRA national chairman Chris Holmes,
who went on to set up Castle Rock Brewery. In 2007, the Vic was transferred
to Batemans in a deal that saw Nottingham’s Lincolnshire Poacher move to
Tynemill.

Throughout all the changes of ownership, the beer quality has remained high.
This is thanks to the efforts of manager and cellar keeper, Neil Renshaw,
who has worked at the pub for 25 years.

Lincoln Beer Festival 22nd-24th May 2014

BF Logo 2014From humble beginnings in the late 1970s, the Lincoln Beer Festival has grown to become a major event in the city’s social calendar. Last year, over 3,500 customers enjoyed the traditional ales and great atmosphere. Visitors are attracted to the event from across the country.

The first Lincoln Beer Festival was held in the upstairs room of the Stag’s Head on Newport in 1977. Since then, it has been held in the Assembly Rooms and the old Drill Hall, and under canvas on the Brayford and The Lawns. The festival returned to the Drill Hall in 2005, and this year’s is the tenth to be held at the venue since it was refurbished.

Steve Renshaw, the festival organiser, said, “I’ve been to lots of beer festivals but I’ve not been in a better venue than the Drill Hall. The main bar area has plenty of room for drinkers to chat about the beers. We have live music in the café area, so it doesn’t impact on the conversations. And, if the weather is good, the courtyard is a great place to chill out. We’ve developed a really good relationship with the Drill Hall staff – putting on the event is a real team effort.”

The festival has two main aims.  For those who are regular drinkers of real ale, cider and perry, a wide range of drinks is provided, many of which would not normally be found in this part of the country.  Ales from many local breweries are also showcased. And for those who are not yet devotees, the huge variety of styles and flavours to be discovered in our traditional British drinks is demonstrated.

At the first festival, back in 1977, there were just ten beers. This year’s real ale list has more than 100 entries from all over the UK. Also featured are traditional, farm-produced cider and perry, plus bottled beers from around the world.

The festival is organised and staffed by unpaid volunteers from the Lincoln branch of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA).

Opening times, Beers, Live Music

Mild Month

May is Mild Month 

CAMRA promotes Mild throughout May.

Mild MonthThis year we are asking the active CAMRA branches to encourage at least one pub in their area to stock at least one Mild during May for the local pub-goers to try.

We would also encourage non-active members to speak to their local licensees to see if they would be willing to try some Milds during May.

We have produced a pack which contains promotional material to support Mild Month. You can order you pack online here

What is mild? 
mild
Milds are black to dark brown to pale amber in colour and come in a variety of styles from warming roasty ales to light refreshing lunchtime thirst quenchers. Malty and possibly sweet tones dominate the flavour profile but there may be a light hop flavour or aroma. Slight diacetyl (toffee/butterscotch) flavours are not inappropriate. Alcohol levels are typically low.

Pale milds tend to have a lighter, more fruity aroma with gentle hoppiness.

Dark milds may have a light roast malt or caramel character in aroma and taste.

Scottish cask beers may have mild characteristics with a dominance of sweetness, smooth body and light bitterness.

Original gravity: less than 1043
Typical alcohol by volume: less than 4.3%
Final gravity 1004 – 1010
Bitterness 14 – 28 EBU